Stephen Collie: Overview of the New Zealand Economy

New Zealand Economy

“New Zealand, or Aotearoa has an open economy that works on free market principles”, says Stephen Collie. In the last three decades our economy has gone from being virtually over-regulated in the OECD to one of the least regulated, most free-market based economies.

Fertile soil and excellent growing conditions combined with advanced farming methods and sophisticated agricultural technology provide the ideal environment for pastoral, forestry and horticulture activities. Various primary commodities account for around half of all goods exports and New Zealand is one of the top five dairy exporters in the world.

Complementing primary production are sizeable manufacturing and service sectors and growing high-tech capabilities. Tourism, film production, and winemaking are also significant.

New Zealand EconomyStephen Collie notes: “Our country is one of the few bright spots among industrialized economies”. Loose monetary conditions, gains in real disposable income and solid growth in the construction, retail and tourism sectors have continued despite weak external demand, putting the economy on a solid footing. The unemployment rate dropped to a multi-year low in 2016 Q3 and although business confidence dipped in October, it logged the second highest reading this year, pointing to a still-solid expansion.

The NZ dairy export sector received some welcoming news in October as milk prices have gone up significantly since the end of Q3 and will contribute to easing the financial strain afflicting the industry. However, a massive earthquake struck the South Island of New Zealand on 14 November near Hanmer Springs, leaving a trail of destruction and billions of dollars of damage, according to Prime Minister John Key.

Stephen Collie: “We have a very export-driven competitive economy with exports accounting for about 30% of Gross-Domestic-Product”.

We also have a low-inflation environment, with monetary policy managed by the Reserve Bank, our independent central bank that is charged with maintaining price stability, and our exchange rate is one of long-stading flexibility, and there are no exchange controls or restrictions on bringing in or repatriating funds.

Our country is ranked by the World Bank as the easiest place in the world to start a business (2015) and the world’s second easiest country to do business in generally, and the Heritage Foundation rated NZ the world’s third freest economy in its 2015 IEF, just behind Singapore and Hong Kong.

“There are few restrictions on establishing, owning and operating a business here”, Stephen Collie says. In fact, by using the government’s online portals the official paperwork to set up a business can be completed in a matter of hours. New Zealand came in third in Forbes’ ‘Best Country for Business’ report, (December 2014) just behind Denmark and Hong Kong.

Forbes commented that “Over the past 20 years the government has transformed New Zealand from an agrarian economy dependent on concessionary British market access to a more industrialized, free market economy that can compete globally. This dynamic growth has boosted real incomes and broadened and deepened the technological capabilities of the industrial sector.”

Stephen Collie notes that New Zealand’s economic growth has been faster than most other developed countries in recent years, the OECD commented in 2015 that: “inflation and inflation expectations are well anchored… Strong fiscal monetary policy frameworks and a healthy financial sector have yielded macroeconomic stability, underpinning growth. Employment is high, in large part thanks to flexible labour markets and ample immigration, business investment is robust and households and firms are optimistic.”

New Zealand Dairy ExportsBetween 2000 and 2007, the New Zealand economy expanded by an average of 3.5% each year as private consumption and residential investment grew strongly. Annual inflation averaged 2.6%, inside the Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s 1% to 3% target range, while the current account deficit averaged 5.5% of GDP.

Like most OECD countries, New Zealand’s economy experienced an economic slow-down following the global financial crisis in September 2008. As in other advanced economies, business and consumer confidence declined. Unlike most OECD countries however, after a 2% decline in 2009, the economy pulled out of recession. It achieved 1.7% growth in 2010, 2% in 2011 and 3% in 2012. That compared with 0.3% growth in the UK and negative 0.9% in the euro area; 0.4% in Japan; 1.1% in Canada; and 1.6% in the USA.

Stephen Collie says: “Recovery was led mainly by exports, while relatively strong Government accounts and a well-capitalised banking system provided a stable base for the economy. These positives were supported by the continued boost to GDP from the rebuilding of Christchurch after earthquakes there in 2010 and 2011”.

Recent Economic Performance

By December 2014, annual growth had risen to 3.3%, the fastest rate of expansion in six years and, according the New Zealand Treasury, one of the strongest performances in the OECD

Growth for 2015 is expected to be around 3%, supported by net migration flows, labour income growth, and construction activity. It is expected to fall back for 2016 and 2017, largely due to deteriorating terms of trade, particularly for our dairy exports. This factor has been somewhat offset however by falling oil prices and a lower exchange rate which is helping exporters. From 2018, growth is forecast to pick up again.

Stock market performance

The NZX, The New Zealand stock market has recovered strongly from the global financial crisis, up 121% from 1 April 2009 to 30 June 2015. Despite key economic drivers coming off their highs, steady economic growth and a weaker currency is expected to underpin corporate earnings and securities valuations in the medium term.

This article is inspired by a similar article on www.newzealandnow.govt.nz

About Stephen Collie:

The original article is published here.

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Stephen Collie believes small enterprise will have a big impact on the economy.

Stephen Collie Enterprises

Should you ask Stephen Collie, the future looks vibrant for New Zealand’s overall economy, as a consequence of a surge in quite a few sectors, for example manufacturing. Collie has devoted a great deal of his life to enhancing the enterprise his parents created to succeed.

Stephen Collie’ s father created a construction business soon after coming back home from combating in 2nd World War. Like many family-owned small businesses, the company had very humble beginnings. At the beginning, Steve Collie’s dad had only a single truck. Nowadays, Collie himself is a shareholder within the enterprise and serves as the business manager for its subsidiary, a thriving shipping company. Much like the construction business, the shipping venture began with a single vehicle – one small tugboat. The business today is the owner and operates a number of barges, along with its own workshop, dock, and dry dock.

Stephen CollieThrough the years, Stephen Collie has demonstrated that being seriously active in the day-to-day activities associated with an organization is critical for its prosperity. At some point or another, he’s worked in virtually every job position available within the company. Getting engaged in the business and dealing in functions for instance barge mechanic has demonstrated him what must be done to keep the business running. Also crucial is keeping a small venture way of thinking while being competitive on a major scale.

The Fundamentals of Dredging

The most significant capabilities of a shipping company is dredging. Dredging is just the excretion of sand and sediment out from the ocean or river floor. Many reasons exist why dredging is carried out. When it comes to shipping, the barges acquire sand for the concrete business to use for making its product.

Stephen Collie says that his company appears to have been able to score well in this field simply because it learned from the errors of others. The business witnessed the actions of some other barge or shipping companies, then altered them to generate the greatest results. The shipping business owns its very own related equipment and land, while many other companies rent. The company has to some extent learned the best places to collect the sand by studying the endeavors of others.

Dredging has effectiveness beyond concrete, Collie highlights. It’s also good for the health of the water and the coastline around it. Devoid of frequent removal of sand and silt, certain areas of the water would probably become too shallow for boats for getting through. Shallow waters can drastically restrict trade in New Zealand, as merchandise is not able to get in or out of the country’s ports.
There’s often the question of what to do with the sand that’s dredged up. Concrete is one specific solution. It may also be utilized to repair broken down or drastically changed beaches and to improve the recreational appeal and tourist economy of a region. Preserving healthy and balanced, functional beaches is key to the continuing success of a coastal town. The beach not alone provides people with a place to relax and play. It also safe guards the surrounding area from serious damages after stormy weather, Stephen Collie notes.

Stephen Collie

The original article is published here.

Economy is Important for New Zealand

New Zealand Economy

The economy in New Zealand has performed quite well in recent years, however there are a few bottlenecks especially in housing and urban infrastructure, inequalities in living standards, and rising environmental pressures are all challenges to achieving sustainable and inclusive growth.

Steve Collie: “A study from Roy Morgan Research sheds more light on the subject of the growth of the economy – and its importance within the country”. Without a solid stance on making lasting economic changes aimed at improvement, those in the running for the September elections won’t have a leg to stand on. As it stands, economic issues are the biggest concern for the country’s residents.

According to the report, “When asked about the most important problem facing New Zealand, 42% of New Zealanders mention some kind of Economic issue. This is down 3% since October 2013 but still well ahead of Social issues (21%, up 1%), Government/ Public policy/ Human rights issues (19%, unchanged) and Environmental issues (9%, up 3%).”

New Zealand EconomyRoy Morgan CEO Michele Levine said that continued data aggregation places issues with the economy on the top for both New Zealand and the world at-large. “One of the concerns also sheds light on a problem affecting the whole world: imbalance of wealth”, according to professionals like Roy Morgan and Steve Collie.

As Morgan stated about the issue, “Over the last few surveys the problems within the economy have taken a different shape – or at least are being articulated differently. Since July 2013 more New Zealanders are concerned with the ‘imbalance of wealth’ / ‘the gap between the rich and the poor’ than are concerned about the more ‘economic’ metrics like recession, inflation, exchange rates and the value of the dollar.”

The importance of these issues comes right alongside the viewpoints expressed by current New Zealand Prime Minister John Key. Many analysts believe that this alignment will likely lead to his reelection in September. “However, other candidates could easily overtake Key if this emphasis is lost in the coming months” Steve Collie says.

Tourism and Growth in New Zealand

One big example of investing in the country comes through a $1.92 million investment in the tourism industry. A report from Creative NZ, the arts council of New Zealand, the investment comes as a way to encourage more touring throughout the country – a big draw for both locals and travelers visiting the nation which will also benefit the locals economy.

As Creative New Zealand Senior Manager Cath Cardiff described, the investment reflects an important area of the country’s tourism – and one that was directly in need of something more. “An effective way to develop and manage touring of medium scale work has long been identified as a missing link in our arts infrastructure,” Cardiff said. “The agency and fund will be a catalyst for ensuring more audiences enjoy great New Zealand performing art experiences.”

Steve Collie and Cath Cardiff: “This arts-based initiative showcases the country’s willingness to invest money where it’s needed for improvement”. Investing in programs and changes within the arts will also likely drive tourism and recreation within the country. As Cardiff continued, “In our small country touring is essential for maintaining and increasing audiences for our arts companies and for sustaining the life of a new work beyond its first season.”

Growth is coming in practically every industry within the country of New Zealand. As marketing professional Steve Collie recently described, many of the country’s investments in tourism and beyond are already showing benefits within other industries.

New Zealand EconomyIn Steve Collie’s words, “I work in online marketing, but that doesn’t mean I can’t see effort to grow the economy in other fields when I see it. I think that initiatives like the government’s recent $2 million commitment to driving tourism show that the current administration is doing its part to address the economic concerns of the electorate.”

Business professionals see government initiatives like this as a positive sign of growth and commitment. And this type of positive energy feeds into an overall improvement in how residents and business owners approach their country’s pride and that includes the economy.

“It’s hallmarks like these that show a government on the right track,” Steve Collie continued.

Without a streamlined focus on the economic issues facing New Zealand, those in the running face alienating themselves from residents. The economy needs to remain a top concern – and this includes making lasting changes for improvements. While business professionals like Steve Collie reflect on the current improvements of the economy, they also look forward to bigger and better things in years to come.

 

The original article is published here.

Stephen Collie: Local Business Helping NZ Economy

New Zealand Local Business

Small enterprise is without a doubt positively playing a major part in the economic health and stability of New Zealand, says long time entrepreneur and businessman Stephen Collie, the coordinator of Collie Shipping, who operates a number of dredging barges. You see, the government’s latest decision to carry out an assessment of coastal navigation safeness must be music to the ears for many associated with the manufacturing and shipping industry. The report demonstrates that the nation is devoted to delivering individuals with a safe natural environment and to broadening prospects for local companies and business.

Stephen Collie, “Considering how crucial the production sector is for the country’s economic system and just how much of that industry involves the shoreline, whether it is oil drilling or dredging, the review is much more than merely an approach to ensure safety; it becomes an investment in developing the country’s finances.”

Commercial Enterprise in NZ

Small business is in fact relatively big in New Zealand, as reported by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. A large number of companies (97%) have less than 20 staff members. Almost 70 percent of those enterprises do not have staff at all. Throughout several sectors, a surprising greater part of businesses have 19 or fewer personnel. As an example, close to 19,000 businesses in the production sector employ just around 19 people. More than just 48,500 building companies also have less than 20 staff members.

Small enterprise is not just common in New Zealand. You’ll find it adds a significant amount to the country’s Gross Domestic Product as well as many job opportunities for individuals. Companies that employ up to 19 folks contribute close to 30 percent of the country’s GDP, or more than $56 million. Smaller sized businesses also created more than 40 percent of new job opportunities in the country in 2012.

The Safety Review

businessThe effect most typically associated with local business on New Zealand can be clearly seen in the increase of activity on the seaside. According to Maritime New Zealand, the volume of port call, voyages and ships happen to be continuously growing year after year since 2009-2010. In 2012-2013, 869 vessels created in excess of 2,300 voyages and over 5,600 port calls.

The recently released safety review was created to detect risks and assess the existing safety precautions in place, along with potential safety measures, notes Stephen Collie. The review is planned this month and the initial round should certainly last for about Twelve months.

According to the director of Maritime New Zealand, the review is just one part of a whole new focus on building a risk-focused and intelligence-led strategy to safety for all individuals and business. The director emphasized the importance of having a up-to-date and precise picture of what the potential risks are. Also, he mentioned changing technology as an aspect to consider behind the review.

Stephen Collie: “Vessels aren’t only becoming numerous, they’re also ever-increasing in size as well as becoming more technologically advanced. Most vessels currently have sophisticated navigational aids not seen in decades prior”.

Despite the fact that the director emphasizes that the safety review isn’t happening as a consequence a of single incident, past happenings, for example the grounding of the Rena in 2011 and the grounding of Lake Triview this past spring, could have some influence on the review.

The Rena event is often recognized as the worst ecological disaster in the country’s historical past. 3 years after the incident, the hulk of the ship remains to be trapped in the reef. The owner of the Lake Triview, along with crew members and managers will need to show up before the courts, as the ship harmed the reef when it went aground. Crew members also decided not to tell Maritime New Zealand of the grounding, for which they are being penalized.

As soon as completed, the safety review should ideally produce new solutions for workers, local companies and business, making coastal activity more effective and safe for all those involved. “The outcome of the review are anticipated to have a positive effect on the manufacturing industry as well as its workforce”, Stephen Collie says.

References:

Maritime New Zealand

Maritime New Zealand is a great place to work, and its staff are great people to work with. In head office and around the regions, at the front line and behind the scenes, MNZ staff work hard to ensure safe, secure and clean seas and waterways for New Zealand….Learn More

Maritime New Zealand – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A maritime authority called the Marine Board was originally established in 1862 and controlled by the Customs Department until near the end of the nineteenth century, when it was renamed the Marine Department….Learn More

The original article is published here.

Steve Collie: Why Economy is Important for New Zealand

New Zealand Economy

Steve Collie: “A study from Roy Morgan Research sheds more light on the subject of economic growth – and its importance within the country”. Without a solid stance on making lasting economic changes aimed at improvement, those in the running for the September elections won’t have a leg to stand on. As it stands, economic issues are the biggest concern for the country’s residents.

According to the report, “When asked about the most important problem facing New Zealand, 42% of New Zealanders mention some kind of Economic issue. This is down 3% since October 2013 but still well ahead of Social issues (21%, up 1%), Government/ Public policy/ Human rights issues (19%, unchanged) and Environmental issues (9%, up 3%).”

New Zealand EconomyRoy Morgan CEO Michele Levine said that continued data aggregation places economic issues on the top for both New Zealand and the world at-large. “One of the concerns also sheds light on a problem affecting the whole world: imbalance of wealth”, according to professionals like Roy Morgan and Steve Collie.

As Morgan stated about the issue, “Over the last few surveys the economic problems have taken a different shape – or at least are being articulated differently. Since July 2013 more New Zealanders are concerned with the ‘imbalance of wealth’ / ‘the gap between the rich and the poor’ than are concerned about the more ‘economic’ metrics like recession, inflation, exchange rates and the value of the dollar.”

The importance of these issues comes right alongside the viewpoints expressed by current New Zealand Prime Minister John Key. Many analysts believe that this alignment will likely lead to his reelection in September. “However, other candidates could easily overtake Key if this emphasis is lost in the coming months” Steve Collie says.

Tourism and Growth in New Zealand

One big example of investing in the country comes through a $1.92 million investment in the tourism industry. A report from Creative NZ, the arts council of New Zealand, the investment comes as a way to encourage more touring throughout the country – a big draw for both locals and travelers visiting the nation.

As Creative New Zealand Senior Manager Cath Cardiff described, the investment reflects an important area of the country’s tourism – and one that was directly in need of something more. “An effective way to develop and manage touring of medium scale work has long been identified as a missing link in our arts infrastructure,” Cardiff said. “The agency and fund will be a catalyst for ensuring more audiences enjoy great New Zealand performing art experiences.”

Steve Collie and Cath Cardiff: “This arts-based initiative showcases the country’s willingness to invest money where it’s needed for improvement”. Investing in programs and changes within the arts will also likely drive tourism and recreation within the country. As Cardiff continued, “In our small country touring is essential for maintaining and increasing audiences for our arts companies and for sustaining the life of a new work beyond its first season.”

Growth is coming in practically every industry within the country of New Zealand. As marketing professional Steve Collie recently described, many of the country’s investments in tourism and beyond are already showing benefits within other industries.

New Zealand EconomyIn Steve Collie’s words, “I work in online marketing, but that doesn’t mean I can’t see effort to grow the economy in other fields when I see it. I think that initiatives like the government’s recent $2 million commitment to driving tourism show that the current administration is doing its part to address the economic concerns of the electorate.”

Business professionals see government initiatives like this as a positive sign of growth and commitment. And this type of positive energy feeds into an overall improvement in how residents and business owners approach their country’s pride.

“It’s hallmarks like these that show a government on the right track,” Steve Collie continued.

Without a streamlined focus on the economic issues facing New Zealand, those in the running face alienating themselves from residents. The economy needs to remain a top concern – and this includes making lasting changes for improvements. While business professionals like Steve Collie reflect on the current improvements, they also look forward to bigger and better things in years to come.

The original article is published here.

Steve Collie: Dredging Crucial For Flood Restoration

Dredging

Steve Karl Collie explains how dredging is playing an important role in getting East Australia back on track following the aftermath of Cyclone Oswald.

In January 2013, Cyclone Oswald wreaked havoc on parts of Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. The storm had a widespread impact and caused extreme flooding, storms and water damage.

Damage was estimated to be at least Aus$2.4 billion (which equates to about 2.5 billion U.S dollars). The storm affected more than 4,000 homes and 600 businesses in Bundaberg, Australia. During the storm, more than 7,500 residents of the Bundaberg area were evacuated from their homes. Bundaberg Hospital patients and staff were also removed from the location in order to keep them safe. Bridges, transportation routes and area sewage networks were destroyed. In addition, the storm created massive blackouts and thousands of residents were left without power.

Cyclone Oswald caused immense destruction and created an enormous sinkhole that swallowed up an entire two-story building in the Burnett River area of Midtown Marina.

“The storm left many parts of East Australia in bad shape. We are doing our best to repair that damage to get the surrounding cities back on their feet,” says Steve Karl Collie whose dredging company is among those working to repair the effects of the cyclone.

Dredging Australia

In order to help repair the damage of the cyclone, the Australian government has approved a project which will help to transform the ravaged marina into a public park area. According to Dredging Today, the project, which will cost an estimated $2.4 million, is set to involve building a 77-metre long steel sheet-pile retaining wall “with interlocking sections to maximize its strength to withstand future floodwaters, then backfilling the hole to reclaim the riverbank.”

One of the key tools involved in repairing the damage from the storm and transforming the land into a safe public area, is the process of dredging.

Steve Karl Collie explains, “Dredging is the process of excavating an area that is partially under water.”

This is done with the purpose of gathering up various sediments and debris and disposing them in a different location. As a manager at one of the major shipping companies in New Zealand, Steve Karl Collie and his employees are highly involved in the project’s current dredging phase.

“This project is going to clean up the marina and clear up the riverbank area of Bundaberg,” he explains. “It will give the people of Bundaberg their Riverwalk area back.”

According to Stephen Collie, the project will make the marina a safe place for people to frequent in the future. “The marina had just gotten back on its feet after a 2011 flood damaged it. That’s where dredging comes in.”

A variety of companies are currently at work to clean up the marina and to fill in the dangerous sinkhole. Much of this work is being done through the use of a dredger, a machine specifically designed to excavate and remove material from the bottom of the water surrounding the marina. In order to make way for the new project, the fallen building debris will be carried away and the ground will be cleared to make room for the new retention wall.

As reported by News Mail, “approximately 65,000 cubic meters of sand and gravel [will] be dredged from an area near Kirby’s Wall to improve navigation of the river.”

Cyclones are a serious threat to the people of Australia. As seen by the destruction of Cyclone Oswald, one of the worst outcomes of a tropical cyclone is flooding. Fortunately for the people of East Australia, the devastation from the recent storm will soon be cleared up.

The once-destroyed land will be transformed into a cheerful place where businesses will thrive and that locals will frequent in their downtime. Thanks to the help of projects like dredging, the storm’s debris will be cleared up and the waterways will soon be functional again.

In addition, the retaining wall, which the project will build, will help to keep the Bundaberg Marina safe from future storms.

“It’s been great to be a part of this project. We can’t wait to see the marina back on its feet,” says Steve Karl Collie.

The original article is published here.